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As I See It: Are You Properly Trained?

Posted By Joel Kent, Friday, March 23, 2012

It is my firm belief that most of you reading these columns have the intent to avail yourselves of training, but never take advantage of it because something always gets in the way.

What if your competitor took the training and then saturated the area with advertising touting the fact that his or her technicians are now NTS Certified Level II Technicians?

If you were a consumer looking for an alarm system, would you be inclined to look at a company with high standards and qualifications?

That is what proper training and education is all about.

This month, I'd like to talk about the Electronic Access Control (EAC) course, which will educate your technicians about installing and maintaining access control systems.

EAC is a 14-hour classroom course that teaches both the theory and the practical application of locks, door hardware and electronic access control systems. Exercises culminate in an actual system design based on a given customer specification and building plan.

Like many other NTS courses, EAC was was recently re-written to acknowledge changes in technology.

One of the things you must know before you sell the system -- which you will learn about in EAC -- is the defined usage classification of the building. For example, what are the access and egress requirements of the code?

If you are not aware of the code requirements involved in selling and installing an access control system, then you are definitely handicapped. Can you cite the requirements of NFPA 101 as it applies to access control? Do you know there are requirements in NFPA 72? What about the requirements of Article 250? What is Article 250?

Remember: training doesn’t cost. It pays!

Tags:  As I See It  EAC  March 2012 

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